What Is Yin & Yang Yoga

What is Yin & Yang The concept of Yin & Yang has its roots in Taoism, the first written mention being 700 B.C. in the I Ching (“Book of Changes”). The Taoists observed the forces...

Relax, Revitalize, Renew with Simple, Invisible Technique

Taken for granted, misused and abused, forgotten and ignored....the breath that is life giving, if put to proper use with Pranayama (yogic breathing) can help:

  • Eliminate stress, anxiety, irritation, and anger
  • Reduce depression, insomnia and general fatigue
  • Improve blood circulation, lung capacity, digestion & elimination
  • Strengthen abdominal, diaphragm and chest muscles
  • Strengthen heart and lungs, improve lung capacity
It is impossible to list all the benefits of Pranayama...but above are some of the most powerful and impressive ones.  

Chop Wood, Carry Water in the Real World

This is guest post by Joan Klostermann-Ketels of Being of Sound Spirit One of the great challenges to being out in nature – for me anyway – is to get in synch with it. To do that I must first shake my incessant need to DO. In the back of my mind and the pit of my stomach is a gnawing sense that I might be using this time in a more productive way. I should be balancing my checkbook, working on a sales proposal, calling somebody about a meeting or fixing the roof. Of course nothing could be farther from the truth.

15 Ways to Successfully Change a Habit

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit. - Aristotle

  1. According to self-development experts and in my own experience, it takes about 30 days to change a habit.  30 days are less daunting because you know you can just quit and go back to old habits after that time is up.
    1. Within this time, you will give your brain circuits a chance to form new neuro-connections and neuro-pathways ...

The Spirituality of Effective Communication

This is guest post by Joan Klostermann-Ketels of Being of Sound Spirit Say one word with your mouth shut! ~ Zen saying

This wonderful statement implores the student of Zen to convey meaning, intention and condition through simple, focused attention. The idea that a sender of communication could accomplish complete understanding on the part of the receiver by becoming the manifestation of one perfectly formed thought runs counter to our modern society, which relies more on sensory overload.